facts about drug

Oct 232012
 

A few weeks ago, I was approached by a colleague to collaborate on a quickie corporate video. Even before the first meeting with the client, we could feel the deadline approaching like a tropical storm. So speed was key. But we couldn’t compromise production values.

Initial client meetings can be nebulous. You listen to what the client wants from the video, you ask questions to narrow the options and focus the goals, but you often leave that meeting with a yellow pad full of vague possible approaches, to be sorted through later. We couldn’t afford that.

By the time this gathering was drawing to a close, we had defined the audience and purpose: it would be shown internally to employees around the world and would introduce them to the company’s commitment to philanthropy. We knew the length—no more than two and a half minutes—and some of the key elements. It was Friday. We agreed that I would start writing the script on Monday.

And then the scriptwriting muse whispered in my ear: “No, write a draft now, immediately, before leaving the building.” “Seriously?” I answered, “I’ve never done that. I need time to contemplate.” “No, you don’t. No thinking needed … just write.”

Giving the muse the benefit of the doubt (which you should almost always do) I asked one member of the client’s team to stay, because she knew the content and I sure didn’t. Luckily for me, she agreed. I took a script template from a handy folder on my MacBook Pro and jumped right in. She was on the other side of the conference room table, so we started a Skype screen sharing session to be on the same page—literally.

BTW, if you’d like to download my tried-and-true script template to use on your own videos, right-click here. One of the options that pop up should allow you to download the file.

We’d agreed that there should be about 45 seconds of narration in this video. The rest of the time would be filled with pre-existing interview bites from philanthropic projects around the world. We didn’t know yet what these would be, so as the client and I crafted voiceover copy line by line, we simply filled in a bunch of scenes with the words “[insert sound bite(s)]”

The point is that after only a half hour or forty-five minutes we had a complete first draft script, albeit with holes for interview bites. The client had contributed facts and company messages, and I had contributed script-writing experience and savvy.  The cool thing was that the client could take this instant script and distribute it to her colleagues right away for comments and approvals.

Amazingly, the narration in the final script turned out to be really close to the draft we had cobbled together in well under an hour.

If you’d like to look at that first draft, right-click here. One of the options that pop up should allow you to download the file. (I’ve changed names and identifying features, so that you won’t be able to tell who the client was.)

Oh, I almost forgot to mention: knocking out the first draft this way was really fun!

Jun 082010
 

Today’s post is not about how to make a great video. It’s about how to make a quickie video better–in this case, one I put together in just two hours. But I think the tips I’ll offer will apply to many of your creations.

With Dupuytren's contracture, the pinkie is bent and can't straighten.Last March, I glanced at a headline in The New York Times–Bringing Movement Back to Clenched Hands–and realized it was about people like me. Dupuytren’s contracture had caused my pinkie to bend–I couldn’t straighten it out. The article touted a drug treatment, but I felt it gave short shrift to a very effective treatment I’d had.

Since you can see the effects of Dupuytren’s, I thought making a video would be a perfect way to comment on what was missing from the article. But it was a Tuesday morning and I didn’t want to cut into my work week by spending a lot of time  making a masterpiece. The situation called for a quickie video.

What’s the first thing you would have done under the circumstances? What tool would you have reached for? Your camera? A microphone to record your evanescent thoughts?

I did what this video cowboy usually does: I pulled my trusty script template out of its holster … duplicated it … and began writing. (And pardner, if you stick around and read on, I’ll upload a template just for you.)

Five or ten minutes later, I had a finished script. Was it as good as Casablanca? Here’s the opening narration from that classic:

Opening narration from the film "Casablanca"

And here’s the opening narration from my blockbuster:

Opening narration for the Dupuytren's contracture video

OK, so Casablanca wins. The point is not how great my prose was. It was serviceable, which was the mandate. So why do I call the script a “power tool”? Because as I was writing, it gave me the power to see my story in advance of shooting. The script told me what steps I would need to take before uploading the finished piece. After writing the narration and checking that it said what I wanted to say, I quickly filled in the video column. I didn’t need to fill in the scene number column for such a simple project.

The rest of the process was simply following the instructions the script dictated. If you want to see the completed script in all its glory, click here.

This blog is not about the technical side of video-making, so all I’ll say on that account is that I recorded a few standard-def shots with my Canon HV30 and edited in Final Cut Express. I imported some still pictures and a couple of screen shots of the newspaper article into FCE, then added slow moves (mistakenly called the “Ken Burns effect”).

Here’s the finished product–all one minute and twenty-one seconds of it:

It took about two hours to make, start to finish. It hasn’t been viewed as many times as Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance,” but as of this writing it’s had more than 800 views. And maybe it’s helped some people get better treatment for their Dupuytren’s contracture. That’s all I wanted to accomplish with this video, and starting with a script helped me do it easily.

If you’d like to download my tried-and-true script template to use on your own videos, right-click here. One of the options that pop up should allow you to download the file.

As usual, your comments are a power tool for this blog!